Category: Speech in Noise

Speech in Noise

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Empowering Patients with Personalized Compression

There is a strong case for personalization of compression for the individual hearing aid user, with research indicating large variation between individuals and situations in preferences and performance. Such personalization has, until now, been limited to complicated adjustments of gain and compression in the fitting software. In contrast, the new Widex MySound enables the user to personalize compression in a completely new way.

Speech in Noise

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Oticon Expands Oticon More Family

More options — from the new miniRITE T with disposable batteries, and the portable SmartCharger, to new fitting options, and a music-oriented signal processing program — help allow hearing care professionals to “better match each patient’s lifestyle, needs, and preferences.”  For patients with single-sided deafness, Oticon also extends the Oticon CROS family with a new rechargeable Oticon CROS PX transmitter that is compatible with Oticon More.

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Chatable Launches AI V3.0 Edge On-chip Inline DNN

Chatable (HAAC Ltd) announced in a white paper – “Breaking Through the 6ms Latency Barrier” – what the company describes as “a dramatic fundamental breakthrough in artificial intelligence (AI) for conversation enhancement.” The white paper introduces Chatable AI v3.0 Edge: “the first on-chip inline deep neural network (DNN) for direct audio processing that has no perceptible latency.”

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Augmenting Speech Recognition with a New Split-processing Paradigm

Research findings are presented for the Signia AX platform, with its introduction of a new signal processing paradigm called Augmented Focus, which splits the incoming sounds into two separate signal streams. The activation of Augmented Focus showed a significant benefit for speech recognition in background noise, and when compared to leading competitors, a significant advantage also was observed. Additionally, when combined with the Signia AX binaural beamformer, speech recognition for the participants with hearing loss was significantly better than for their normal-hearing counterparts.

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