Category: Research

Research

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Telemedicine Helps Increase Access to Hearing Care in Rural Alaska

The Hearing Norton Sound study, which focused on school-based hearing screening programs in rural Alaska, showed that referring children to specialists via telemedicine provides significantly quicker access to follow-up care than referring them to primary care providers.

Research

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Human Underwater Hearing Better Than Expected

Since the 1950s, several different attempts have been made to measure human hearing underwater. The US military, for example, has had an interest in understanding how divers are affected by underwater explosions, and in general, the hearing tests have been very different.

MarkeTrak 2022: Navigating the Changing Landscape of Hearing Healthcare

MarkeTrak 2022 updates and extends the findings of MT10 (2019) generated by this series of consumer surveys—the most comprehensive and oldest of its kind, dating back to 1989—of hearing aid users and non-users in the United States.  In particular, MT2022 includes new information about hearing aid use by gender and race, and also includes data on cochlear implant use and personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), as well as the emerging class of what may soon become over-the-counter  (OTC) hearing aids.

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Multiple Sclerosis and Hearing Loss

A review and meta-analysis published in “Multiple Sclerosis and Other Related Disorders” examined studies from PubMed (Medline), Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase, from 1970 to July 2021 to find the prevalence of hearing loss among people with multiple sclerosis.

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Study in China Finds Hearing Aids Improve QoL

In a study of 385 adults 45 and older with hearing loss in China, published in “BMC Medicine,” researchers conclude: “It is imperative that middle and older adults with age-related hearing loss wear hearing aids regularly to recover their hearing, as well as strengthen their social participation and social network to further improve QoL.”

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MHealth Tympanometer to Help Treat Childhood Hearing Loss

Samantha Robler, AuD, PhD, from Norton Sound Health Corporation and Susan D. Emmett, MD, MPH, associate professor of head and neck surgery and audiology and associate professor of global health at Duke University, have been researching childhood hearing loss in remote and rural areas of Alaska. Their work identified a gap in the screening tools that can be used to identify children with hearing loss.

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Is Music a Universal Language?

Are we all imagining the same thing when we listen to music, or are our experiences hopelessly subjective? In other words, is music a truly universal language? To investigate those questions, an international team of researchers (including a classical pianist, a rock drummer, and a concert bassist) asked hundreds of people what stories they imagined when listening to instrumental music.

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Hear and Beyond: An Interview with Gael Hannan

Gael Hannan is an advocate, author, and speaker who grew up with a progressive hearing loss that is now severe-to-profound. She is a past director on the national board of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association (CHHA) and has served as a speechreading instructor and volunteer for many hearing-related programs. She developed the Hearing Foundation of Canada’s “Sound Sense” hearing awareness program which is delivered to elementary students across Canada, and created a national awareness campaign on infant hearing screening for the same organization.

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Purdue Professor Helped Build SuperCam’s Recording Ability

For two decades, Roger Wiens has built instruments to give humans eyes and a nose on Mars – and now he’s helping add ears as well. Wiens, a professor of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences in the College of Science at Purdue University, and an expert in Mars robotics technology, led the team that built SuperCam, a device on the Perseverance Mars rover that includes a laser for zapping rocks as well as the microphone that brought the first recordings of Mars to Earth.

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Left Brain Asymmetry and Reading Ability

Publishing in the open-access journal “PLOS Biology” on April 5, the study shows that greater left-brain asymmetry can predict both better performance and average performance on a foundational measure of reading ability, depending on whether analysis is conducted over the whole brain or in specific regions.

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