Tag: background noise

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Study Shows Brain Region Responsible for Sounds of Words

A region crossing the folded surface of the top of the brain, called the dorsal precentral gyrus, plays an essential role in how people use the sound of their voices to control how they want the words to sound, a new study shows.

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‘NY Times’ Article Breaks Down Hidden Hearing Loss

The term “hidden hearing loss” can refer to a person's inability to discern and understand conversation in a noisy setting, such as a bar or restaurant. Also known as the “cocktail party effect,” it can be difficult to diagnose as people who go to an audiologist complaining of hearing loss often score normally on an audiogram, the standard way of measuring hearing function. In a recent “New York Times” article, writer Emma Yasinski discusses the science behind hidden hearing loss as well as potential treatments.

Apple Launches Features for Those with Hearing Loss

Apple announced the introduction of software features “designed for people with mobility, vision, hearing, and cognitive disabilities.” According to Apple’s announcement, “these next-generation technologies showcase Apple’s belief that accessibility is a human right and advance the company’s long history of delivering industry-leading features that make Apple products customizable for all users.”

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A Digital Therapeutic and Hearing Health Coach for Enhancing First-time Hearing Aid Experiences

Developed under an NIH research grant, Amptify is an online aural rehabilitation program and Hearing Health Coach that engages patients and enhances the new hearing aid experience without incurring additional time on the part of a patient’s audiologist. As teleaudiology becomes more commonplace, it is highly likely that Amptify will be the first of many digital therapeutics for the treatment of hearing loss.

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Study Suggests Smart Assistant Fixes for Deaf Users

Researchers identified common challenges these users face in their interactions with smart assistants, such as the default higher-pitched female voices used on many smart assistants being incompatible with hearing aids, and difficulty of use in public places with background noise that competes for their attention, such as nearby conversations or the average commotion in a grocery store.

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