Tag: back to basics

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What Did Skinner & Miller Have to Say About Hearing Aid Fittings?

It is rare to have a column about a review of an article—especially an article from almost 40 years ago—but the 1983 publication by Skinner and Miller is a must-read (or must re-read) article. It describes the work primarily done by Margaret (Margo) Skinner in her PhD thesis.

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Asymptotic Hearing Loss: When Is a Metaphor Just a Metaphor?

Like all healthcare fields where the clinician needs to explain complex concepts to the lay public, metaphors are used. In the optical field, “nearsighted” and “farsighted” are actually good metaphors despite their simplicity and academic inaccuracy. In the field of audiology, we have the description of the audiogram with the piano keyboard across the top; a good explanation, but limited in that it’s only the right hand side of the keyboard and musical notes are not pure-tones.

OTC and Observations on the Humes et al Study

Perhaps the most well-read article of 2017 is “The effects of service-delivery model and purchase price on hearing-aid outcomes in older adults: a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial” by Larry Humes and his colleagues at Indiana State University, published in the March 2017 edition of the American Journal of Audiology. Drs Marshall Chasin and Steve Aiken provide their perspectives on this important research.

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Back to Basics: Music Listening and Hearing Aids. Are All Approaches the Same? Stop and Listen.

In the past several years the hearing aid industry has introduced some ingenious solutions to handling the “music and hearing aids” problem. Simply stated, the higher level inputs of music tend to overdrive the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter or “front end” in many hearing aids. Dr Chasin discusses some possible solutions for music listening.

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Back to Basics: Linguistics 101 for Hearing Healthcare Professionals

The Speech Intelligibility Index (or SII) shows some interesting characteristics. The difference between 340 Hz and 3,400 Hz (coincidentally the bandwidth of the telephone) is fairly similar for continuous discourse, whereas there is a high frequency bias for nonsense syllables. That is, whenever there is a context to speech, there is a greater reliance on lower frequency sounds.

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