Tag: Tinnitus

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Sensaphonics’ 3D Active Ambient System Used by Dave Amato of REO Speedwagon

Dave Amato, lead guitarist of REO Speedwagon, shares his experiences (and audiograms!) regarding in-ear monitors that have helped save his residual hearing. “Dr Santucci made it very clear to me that I had to change and start wearing both earpieces if I wanted to save my hearing,” says Amato. “...It changed my life.”

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HHF Releases New Video for ‘Protect Your Hearing Month’

Marking October’s National Protect Your Hearing Month, Hearing Health Foundation (HHF) announced that it is releasing the first of a new video series called “A Few Words About Hearing” that captures the stories of nine people—from all walks of life—who describe what it's like to live with hearing damaged by loud noise.

Treating Tinnitus with Sound Therapy

In the study, 18 people with tinnitus listened for an hour a day over three months to recordings of a sound matched to their tinnitus, what Dr Searchfield describes as a “tinnitus avatar” that morphed into a real-world noises such as cicadas or birds chirping, a fan, water, rain, or some combination of those sounds.

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Diabetes and Hearing Loss

Researchers examining the link between hearing loss and lifestyle factors believe that hearing healthcare has an important role in diabetes care and management. And now the American Diabetes Association, the CDC, and others are starting to agree…

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Coping with Tinnitus

While there is no cure for tinnitus, numerous treatment options continue to emerge, including tinnitus management programs administered by hearing care professionals, hearing aids including those with tinnitus remediation features, sound therapy systems, and tinnitus coaching apps.

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UMSOM Researchers Study Music Volume During Workouts

Fitness center instructors often turn up music volumes significantly during classes sometimes loud enough to cause hearing damage based on an assumption that participants will work out more intensively when volumes are raised. A new University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) study—a summary of which appears on the UMSOM website—however, found that those who attend indoor cycling (“spinning”) classes do not lower the intensity of their workouts when the volume is reduced to a safer decibel level.

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