Tag: auditory cortex

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Humans, Monkeys, Guinea Pigs Experience Sound Similarly

Speech sounds elicit comparable neural responses and stimulate the same region in the brain of humans, macaques, and guinea pigs, a multidisciplinary group of University of Pittsburgh researchers reported in the journal “eNeuro.” The finding could help pave the way for better understanding and diagnosis of auditory processing deficits.

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How Might the Brain Change When We Reintroduce Sound? Interview with Anu Sharma, PhD

New research shows that after wearing professionally fit quality hearing aids, a patient's brain may “re-organize” its auditory processing centers back towards its original state prior to the hearing loss—with corresponding gains in auditory speech perception abilities and improvements in global cognitive function, executive function, processing speed, and visual working memory performance. Anu Sharma discusses the research findings with Douglas Beck.

Researchers Identify Brain Regions in Blind Individuals Responsible for Sharpened Auditory Function

Research has shown that people who are born blind or become blind early in life often have a more nuanced sense of hearing, especially when it comes to musical abilities and tracking moving objects in space (imagine crossing a busy road using sound alone). For decades scientists have wondered what changes in the brain might underlie these enhanced auditory abilities.

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Cortical Neuroplasticity in Hearing Loss: Why It Matters in Clinical Decision-Making for Children and Adults

With a better understanding of cortical brain changes associated with hearing loss, the potential to develop objective brain-based tools (ie, biomarkers) increases. These tools may help clinicians determine when a patient should receive intervention, what kind of intervention or rehabilitation would be ideal, and may offer the ability to monitor how well a chosen intervention or rehabilitation method is working. Prominent researchers Anu Sharma and Hannah Glick explain why.

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